Suppenabkellerteil

Neoliberalismus: Demokratie als Problem →

"Doch ein zentrales Motiv, das sich in den meisten Variationen des neoliberalen Denkens und auch bei Hayek findet, ist die Problematisierung der Demokratie"



"The film is principally set in Buenos Aires, a city very different from Hong Kong, yet there is no difficulty in assuming that in some way Wong Kar-Wai is always discussing Hong Kong, such as when he shows Taipei in Happy Together and his use of Manila in Days of Being Wild. That would be following the principle that Marco Polo gives when talking to the Emperor in Italo Calvino’s novel, Invisible Cities: 
And Polo said: ‘Every time I describe a city I am saying something about Venice.’'When I ask you about other cities, I want to hear about them. And about Venice, when I ask you about Venice.''To distinguish the other cities' qualities, I must speak of a first city that remains implicit. For me it is Venice.''You should then begin each tale of your travels from the departure, describing Venice as it is, all of it, not omitting anything you remember of it…''Memory's images, once they are fixed in words, are erased,' Polo said. 'Perhaps I am afraid of losing Venice all at once, if I speak of it. Or perhaps, speaking of other cities, I have already lost it, little by little.'
In this way, every city might become, for Wong Kar-Wai, a way of describing Hong Kong, an allegory for a city which cannot be shown directly, for, if it could, it might lead to a loss of the subject.”  
Wong Kar-wai’s Happy Together (The New Hong Kong Cinema), Jeremy Tambling

"The film is principally set in Buenos Aires, a city very different from Hong Kong, yet there is no difficulty in assuming that in some way Wong Kar-Wai is always discussing Hong Kong, such as when he shows Taipei in Happy Together and his use of Manila in Days of Being Wild. That would be following the principle that Marco Polo gives when talking to the Emperor in Italo Calvino’s novel, Invisible Cities: 
And Polo said: ‘Every time I describe a city I am saying something about Venice.’'When I ask you about other cities, I want to hear about them. And about Venice, when I ask you about Venice.''To distinguish the other cities' qualities, I must speak of a first city that remains implicit. For me it is Venice.''You should then begin each tale of your travels from the departure, describing Venice as it is, all of it, not omitting anything you remember of it…''Memory's images, once they are fixed in words, are erased,' Polo said. 'Perhaps I am afraid of losing Venice all at once, if I speak of it. Or perhaps, speaking of other cities, I have already lost it, little by little.'
In this way, every city might become, for Wong Kar-Wai, a way of describing Hong Kong, an allegory for a city which cannot be shown directly, for, if it could, it might lead to a loss of the subject.”  
Wong Kar-wai’s Happy Together (The New Hong Kong Cinema), Jeremy Tambling

"The film is principally set in Buenos Aires, a city very different from Hong Kong, yet there is no difficulty in assuming that in some way Wong Kar-Wai is always discussing Hong Kong, such as when he shows Taipei in Happy Together and his use of Manila in Days of Being Wild. That would be following the principle that Marco Polo gives when talking to the Emperor in Italo Calvino’s novel, Invisible Cities

And Polo said: ‘Every time I describe a city I am saying something about Venice.’
'When I ask you about other cities, I want to hear about them. And about Venice, when I ask you about Venice.'
'To distinguish the other cities' qualities, I must speak of a first city that remains implicit. For me it is Venice.'
'You should then begin each tale of your travels from the departure, describing Venice as it is, all of it, not omitting anything you remember of it…'
'Memory's images, once they are fixed in words, are erased,' Polo said. 'Perhaps I am afraid of losing Venice all at once, if I speak of it. Or perhaps, speaking of other cities, I have already lost it, little by little.'

In this way, every city might become, for Wong Kar-Wai, a way of describing Hong Kong, an allegory for a city which cannot be shown directly, for, if it could, it might lead to a loss of the subject.”  

Wong Kar-wai’s Happy Together (The New Hong Kong Cinema), Jeremy Tambling


hat die Ehre, die Premierenfeier dieses schönen Heimatfilms zu moderieren: Auf die Barockaden, ab Oktober im Kino am Spittelberg! (hier: Augartenspitz) View Larger

hat die Ehre, die Premierenfeier dieses schönen Heimatfilms zu moderieren: Auf die Barockaden, ab Oktober im Kino am Spittelberg! (hier: Augartenspitz)


morgan-leigh:

retronauthq:

1953: “House for the Atomic Age”
“A swimming pool that becomes an automatic decontamination bath during an A-bomb attack is one of the features of a home that Hal B. Hayes, Hollywood contractor, is completing for himself. In the hillside next to the swimming pool he’s building an underground sanctuary that you reach by diving into the pool. His house is designed to “bring the outdoors indoors” for ordinary peaceful living, yet has a structure built to resist great destructive forces. Several of the walls are completely of glass that would be swept away by a powerful shock wave, but could later be replaced. A continuation of his living-room rug is pulled up to shroud the glass wall in that room when a button is pressed. 
Other walls of the house have a fluted design to resist shock wave and a fireproof exterior surface of Gunite. 
A garden growing in half a foot of soil on the flat roof provides insulation against extreme heat or shock. All exposed wood, inside and outside of the house, is fire-resistant redwood coated with fire-retarding paint. In addition to the underground sanctuary, equipped with bottled oxygen, there is a bombproof shelter in the house itself, consisting of a large steel and concrete vault containing a sitting room and bathroom. Other features of the home include a three-story indoor tree…”
Source

This incidentally was already in my queue and is the house from Charlotte’s fic that I just reblogged. IT IS SO COOL. The Cold War was bizarre.
View Larger

morgan-leigh:

retronauthq:

1953: “House for the Atomic Age”

“A swimming pool that becomes an automatic decontamination bath during an A-bomb attack is one of the features of a home that Hal B. Hayes, Hollywood contractor, is completing for himself. In the hillside next to the swimming pool he’s building an underground sanctuary that you reach by diving into the pool. His house is designed to “bring the outdoors indoors” for ordinary peaceful living, yet has a structure built to resist great destructive forces. Several of the walls are completely of glass that would be swept away by a powerful shock wave, but could later be replaced. A continuation of his living-room rug is pulled up to shroud the glass wall in that room when a button is pressed.

Other walls of the house have a fluted design to resist shock wave and a fireproof exterior surface of Gunite.

A garden growing in half a foot of soil on the flat roof provides insulation against extreme heat or shock. All exposed wood, inside and outside of the house, is fire-resistant redwood coated with fire-retarding paint. In addition to the underground sanctuary, equipped with bottled oxygen, there is a bombproof shelter in the house itself, consisting of a large steel and concrete vault containing a sitting room and bathroom. Other features of the home include a three-story indoor tree…”

Source

This incidentally was already in my queue and is the house from Charlotte’s fic that I just reblogged. IT IS SO COOL. The Cold War was bizarre.